The Worst Candy For Your Teeth

Written by Saddle Rock Pediatric Dentistry on April 26, 2016

There are times when we all have a hard time saying no to candy, especially during those times of year candy seems to be everywhere, such as Easter and Halloween. There are most definitely some candies that are worse than others, and can wreak havoc on you and your child’s teeth. Read on to learn more about the worst candy, and some possible alternatives to offer instead. Thanks for visiting us at Saddle Rock Pediatric Dentistry of Aurora, CO. 

1. The Worst Candy for Your Child’s Teeth

We’d like to start off by stating the obvious: no candy is actually good for your child’s teeth. While some are better than others, it’s important to be careful about the kind of candy you let your children eat.

Most candies contain high amounts of sugar. This sugar actually feeds harmful bacteria in your child’s mouth – bacteria that produces plaque. If teeth are not adequately taken care of (brushed, flossed, etc.), plaque can easily build up and begin to decay teeth.

Tooth decay that is left untreated by a dentist can cause serious damage to your child’s oral health, causing conditions such as gum disease.

Hard Candy

Hard candies usually take a while to dissolve, giving the sugar more time to collect on the teeth. Especially if children chew the hard candy, pieces can become wedged in the teeth, causing further damage.

The Culprits: Lollipops (Tootsie Pops), Jolly Ranchers, Jaw Breakers, etc.

Sticky/Chewy Candy

Candies that are sticky or chewy are sisters to hard candies. Particles of the candy can easily linger on the teeth, creating more plaque faster. This is unfortunate since chewy candies are often kids’ favorites.

The Culprits: Gummy Bears/Worms, Taffy, Jelly Beans, Candy Corn, Snickers, etc.

Sour Candy

Candy that is sour uses a whole new tactic to ruin your child’s smile. Since they are made of sugar, they still feed bacteria but in addition to that, they often contain an acidic element – to make them sour. Acid erodes enamel on teeth – the protective coating around each tooth – making them more susceptible to decay.

The Culprits: Sour Patch Kids, WarHeads, Sour Skittles, etc.

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Posted Under: Blog, Healthy Eating, Oral Health